The Winding Path of a Physics Conversation

In my line of work, I spend a lot of time explaining physics. I write posts here of course, and give the occasional public lecture. I also explain physics when I supervise Master’s students, and in a broader sense whenever I chat with my collaborators or write papers. I’ll explain physics even more when I start teaching. But of all the ways to explain physics, there’s one that has always been my favorite: the one-on-one conversation.

Talking science one-on-one is validating in a uniquely satisfying way. You get instant feedback, questions when you’re unclear and comprehension when you’re close. There’s a kind of puzzle to it, discovering what you need to fill in the gaps in one particular person’s understanding. As a kid, I’d chase this feeling with imaginary conversations: I’d plot out a chat with Democritus or Newton, trying to explain physics or evolution or democracy. It was a game, seeing how I could ground our modern understanding in concepts someone from history already knew.

Way better than Parcheesi

I’ll never get a chance in real life to explain physics to a Democritus or a Newton, to bridge a gap quite that large. But, as I’ve discovered over the years, everyone has bits and pieces they don’t yet understand. Even focused on the most popular topics, like black holes or elementary particles, everyone has gaps in what they’ve managed to pick up. I do too! So any conversation can be its own kind of adventure, discovering what that one person knows, what they don’t, and how to connect the two.

Of course, there’s fun in writing and public speaking too (not to mention, of course, research). Still, I sometimes wonder if there’s a career out there in just the part I like best: just one conversation after another, delving deep into one person’s understanding, making real progress, then moving on to the next. It wouldn’t be efficient by any means, but it sure sounds fun.

2 thoughts on “The Winding Path of a Physics Conversation

  1. Dan

    Be ready to learn more physics as you teach it! Or often, to understand it more deeply, and in a more inter-connected way. It’s one of the joys of teaching.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. Dimitris Papadimitriou

    Even brief conversations about blog posts can be thought provoking , especially for us readers , as they reveal sometimes gaps in our knowledge of topics that interest us.
    Motivated by the last post and the conversation about Cosmology , black holes etc , I searched for some papers I hadn’t noticed before , I clarified some things , also new questions have arisen , and that’s good!

    Like

    Reply

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