The Amplitudes Assembly Line

In the amplitudes field, we calculate probabilities for particles to interact.

We’re trying to improve on the old-school way of doing this, a kind of standard assembly line. First, you define your theory, writing down something called a Lagrangian. Then you start drawing Feynman diagrams, starting with the simplest “tree” diagrams and moving on to more complicated “loops”. Using rules derived from your Lagrangian, you translate these Feynman diagrams into a set of integrals. Do the integrals, and finally you have your answer.

Our field is a big tent, with many different approaches. Despite that, a kind of standard picture has emerged. It’s not the best we can do, and it’s certainly not what everyone is doing. But it’s in the back of our minds, a default to compare against and improve on. It’s the amplitudes assembly line: an “industrial” process that takes raw assumptions and builds particle physics probabilities.

amplitudesassembly

  1. Start with some simple assumptions about your particles (what mass do they have? what is their spin?) and your theory (minimally, it should obey special relativity). Using that, find the simplest “trees”, involving only three particles: one particle splitting into two, or two particles merging into one.
  2. With the three-particle trees, you can now build up trees with any number of particles, using a technique called BCFW (named after its inventors, Ruth Britto, Freddy Cachazo, Bo Feng, and Edward Witten).
  3. Now that you’ve got trees with any number of particles, it’s time to get loops! As it turns out, you can stitch together your trees into loops, using a technique called generalized unitarity. To do this, you have to know what kinds of integrals are allowed to show up in your result, and a fair amount of effort in the field goes into figuring out a better “basis” of integrals.
  4. (Optional) Generalized unitarity will tell you which integrals you need to do, but those integrals may be related to each other. By understanding where these relations come from, you can reduce to a basis of fewer “master” integrals. You can also try to aim for integrals with particular special properties, quite a lot of effort goes in to improving this basis as well. The end goal is to make the final step as easy as possible:
  5. Do the integrals! If you just want to get a number out, you can use numerical methods. Otherwise, there’s a wide variety of choices available. Methods that use differential equations are probably the most popular right now, but I’m a fan of other options.

Some people work to improve one step in this process, making it as efficient as possible. Others skip one step, or all of them, replacing them with deeper ideas. Either way, the amplitudes assembly line is the background: our current industrial machine, churning out predictions.

2 thoughts on “The Amplitudes Assembly Line

  1. aaarboretum

    Does this tree method work for combining diagrams together? If I have a Higgs boson that decays to two Z bosons, that’s a 1 to 2 tree diagram. Then if those Z bosons decay to two leptons, then that’s another two 1 to 2 tree diagrams. So would I just add all three of these diagrams together to start off my “Step 1” to calculate the amplitude for a full Higgs to 4 lepton decay?

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    1. 4gravitonsandagradstudent Post author

      If by “add them all together” you mean “use all of them to build your desired tree amplitude” then yes (you don’t literally add them together). That said, there is some subtlety to this method when there are several different types of particles involved, and for a decay that’s otherwise that simple (since essentially only one diagram contributes at tree level, if I’m thinking about this right) you would probably just use Feynman diagrams.

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