Quelques Houches

For the last two weeks I’ve been at Les Houches, a village in the French Alps, for the Summer School on Structures in Local Quantum Field Theory.

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To assist, we have a view of some very large structures in local quantum field theory

Les Houches has a long history of prestigious summer schools in theoretical physics, going back to the activity of Cécile DeWitt-Morette after the second world war. This was more of a workshop than a “school”, though: each speaker gave one talk, and they weren’t really geared for students.

The workshop was organized by Dirk Kreimer and Spencer Bloch, who both have a long track record of work on scattering amplitudes with a high level of mathematical sophistication. The group they invited was an even mix of physicists interested in mathematics and mathematicians interested in physics. The result was a series of talks that managed to both be thoroughly technical and ask extremely deep questions, including “is quantum electrodynamics really an asymptotic series?”, “are there simple graph invariants that uniquely identify Feynman integrals?”, and several talks about something called the Spine of Outer Space, which still sounds a bit like a bad sci-fi novel. Along the way there were several talks showcasing the growing understanding of elliptic polylogarithms, giving me an opportunity to quiz Johannes Broedel about his recent work.

While some of the more mathematical talks went over my head, they spurred a lot of productive dialogues between physicists and mathematicians. Several talks had last-minute slides, added as a result of collaborations that happened right there at the workshop. There was even an entire extra talk, by David Broadhurst, based on work he did just a few days before.

We also had a talk by Jaclyn Bell, a former student of one of the participants who was on a BBC reality show about training to be an astronaut. She’s heavily involved in outreach now, and honestly I’m a little envious of how good she is at it.

2 thoughts on “Quelques Houches

  1. Jan Reimers

    Sounds like an interesting session. OK I’ll bite : If perturbation QED is not a asymptotic series then what else could it be? Do we still believe the radius of convergence is zero?
    Thanks
    Jan

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    1. 4gravitonsandagradstudent Post author

      I think Cvitanovic was arguing that QED might actually have a finite, nonzero radius of convergence. Essentially, the original arguments that QED would have zero radius of convergence were based on counting Feynman diagrams, but that isn’t actually how fast the amplitude grows, minimally it should only be growing as fast as the number of gauge-invariant sets of diagrams.

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